Blogiversary Blowout: Katherine Owen Shares What She Loves about Lincoln Presley and Her Favorite Scene

a blogiversary banner

It’s a pleasure to have Katherine Owen today on the blog as she shares some awesome thoughts about her books.

I would also like to thank her for taking part in our Blogiversary Celebrations.

Katherine is the author of the Truth In Lies series including This Much is True; The Truth About Air & Water and other dark, angsty love stuff.


Congratulations to everyone at Bookish Temptations on your three-year Blogiversary!!! Thank you for being so innovative with your posts and Illustrated Temptations’ pic quotes. You all are so supportive of authors and their books on your blog. It is so appreciated!!! Love it!

What do you love most about THE guy in your books?

Lincoln Presley is the hero in the Truth In Lies series. In the first book, This Much Is True, Linc is pretty much perfect, and he is taken with Tally Landon from the moment they met. As the writer of this hero, I like to think it’s because he recognizes her pain. Truly. I think what makes him so amazing is his patience with Tally and his utter belief in her at a soul level. This doesn’t mean that things go perfectly for either one of these two. Timing wreaks havoc with their lives and Tally’s inability to reveal the truth makes things a lot more complicated, but she has her reasons! In some ways, Linc tends to believe people as they portray themselves to be. He is more trusting than Tally, which sometimes gets him into trouble. He’s a peacemaker and tends to avoid conflict; I don’t think this makes him passive; he’s just more easygoing and embraces life more fully than our heroine Tally Landon. One reader put it this way:

Linc is a great guy who kept on drawing the short stick all throughout the story since he meets Tally. He is caring, sensitive and occasionally a coward. He definitely is an American sweetheart, and his funny and witty side comes at some of the most inopportune moments. However, this gives him the power to diffuse the bomb that is Tally Landon.

I think this assessment is spot on. Linc is the only one who understands her in This Much Is True.

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Now, in The Truth About Air & Water, book 2, in the Truth In Lies series, I take things a little further with Linc. His easygoing nature and circumstances beyond his control have him siding with his father without asking questions. This causes further turmoil in what is happening with Linc early in the second book. Tally views Linc’s actions and duplicity on a level of betrayal, which causes even more conflict for these two. Some of this could be cleared up by simple communication, but the complexities of their relationship get in the way of that happening right away and then Linc makes a mistake that appears to be unavoidable and that sets things in motion for them both.
How’s that for not giving away much storyline? Truly, it’s pretty vague.
The thing is Linc’s character grows by leaps and bounds in The Truth About Air & Water. I think readers come away loving him more in knowing he’s not infallible or perfect. And yet, his love for Tally remains even when he’s unsure of himself or his life with baseball. Overall? Lincoln Davis Presley is a good guy, and most readers just love him for that.

I’ll digress here. There is another character in the second book, The Truth About Air & Water, who causes turmoil for Linc in terms of captivating Tally’s attention, and that is Sam Wilde. Sam caused problems for the writer, too! Sam is so different from Linc; he’s more mysterious and yet still so sure of himself like Linc but for different reasons far beyond being America’s favorite baseball player. That side of Sam intrigues Tally and from the very start, he recognizes Tally’s pain too, which makes him even more attractive. Sam seems so grounded, and he provides emotional support to Tally when she really needs it the most. It was a bit of balancing act because at times Sam did try to take over the storyline, but the changes in Linc start to become apparent by the end of the book and ring true for both Tally and readers. It was a challenge to write about two Alpha males who are both nice guys and yet ultimately portray who was best for our heroine. It was fun to write!

What is your favorite scene that you wrote and why?

My favorite scene has to be the one at O’ Riley’s. Linc is somewhat oblivious to how pissed off Tally is and the finale in that scene is of epic proportions. In fact, that whole night goes to a new level by the end of it. The challenge as a writer was to make it believable. How crazy was Tally going to get? I wrestled with that, but the scene came together almost like a puzzle over the course of the book by what has transpired between these two and what readers know to be true about Tally’s issues and insecurities, so it really worked. It is of epic proportions. I’ll say that much without giving anything away.
I love music, and I had the Dirty Dancing scene in mind as I was putting it together because I had been listening to a lot of John Mayer’s songs as of late and Free Fallin’ fit perfectly to what was going on between Linc and Tally. Additionally, it wasn’t as predictable as just referencing the song that Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey made famous and danced to in the movie. John Mayer’s rendition of the song, Free Fallin’, perfectly fits the sentiment of what Tally was feeling at the time as well as Linc, who really has no idea just how mad our heroine is at him. And yet, by the end of the scene, I think readers feel Tally’s pain as acutely as these two characters are intended to.

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LOVED!!!!! Thank YOU so much Katherine, for sharing this with us.

About the Author:

A penchant for angst, a little drama, and the unintentional complications of love began early on when she won a poetry contest at the age of fourteen and appears to be without end. Owen has an avid love of coffee, books, and writing, but not necessarily in that order.

Owen writes both Contemporary Romance and New Adult fiction, which includes her bestselling TRUTH IN LIES Series beginning with “This Much Is True” released in August 2013. Her latest release in the series (a series despite despising series) is The Truth About Air & Water. The TRUTH IN LIES series is fan-driven. So. There will be a third book about Linc and Tally in 2015.

Owen’s fiction. This is NOT the light trope stuff nor the obligatory inclusion of sex scenes for half the book which everyone starts to skip. (Come on; you know THAT’S true). Instead, Owen makes her own unique, writerly path by writing dark and angsty (a “non-word” she’s fond of) emotional love stories. Readers are often warned to be prepared with: time, tissues, wine, Advil or your drug of choice.

And as her character Lincoln Presley would say, “do what you must, Princess.”

Always writing…
Owen lives in an old house near Seattle with her family where she is working on her next book, like always, while her family wishes she would cook better and clean more. Cinderella, she is not; and she constantly reminds them of this.

Blog / Twitter / Goodreads / Facebook / Tumblr

Made with Repix (http://repix.it)

Katherine offers to give away an ebook of both her books to one lucky winner! Open Internationally. 😉

Don’t forget to enter the amazing giveaway by clicking HERE.

***No purchase necessary***

Good luck guys!

Laters,

x gel

 

One thought on “Blogiversary Blowout: Katherine Owen Shares What She Loves about Lincoln Presley and Her Favorite Scene

  1. Thanks for featuring my work and inviting me to guest post. Congrats on three years of blogging ~ fantastic!

    Katherine Owen

    Liked by 1 person

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